Hot week to come could result in record energy usage

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On a 100-degree day, APS says all of its customers use about 4,500 megawatts of power at any given moment. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) On a 100-degree day, APS says all of its customers use about 4,500 megawatts of power at any given moment. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
APS has crews doing needed repairs now, so there won’t be any issues with equipment when they're most needed. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) APS has crews doing needed repairs now, so there won’t be any issues with equipment when they're most needed. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
APS is also monitoring its power production and usage in a special control room. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) APS is also monitoring its power production and usage in a special control room. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
APS recommends if you can handle it, set your thermostat to 79 degrees, enough to keep you cool and your energy consumption at a minimum. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) APS recommends if you can handle it, set your thermostat to 79 degrees, enough to keep you cool and your energy consumption at a minimum. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

While the National Weather Service is cranking out heat warnings, many of us are preparing to crank up our air conditioners, nearly doubling the daily amount of power consumed in the Valley.

With those record temps looming, APS is getting ready. It has crews doing needed repairs now, so there won’t be any issues with equipment when they're most needed.

[RELATED: Weather Alerts | 7-Day Forecast]

It’s also monitoring its power production and usage in a special control room.

"If you came back next Tuesday at a similar time you'd probably see us using just about every generating station we have in our system," said Brad Albert, APS general manager of resource management.

On a 100 degree day, APS says all of its customers use about 4,500 megawatts of power at any given moment.

But come Tuesday, if it does hit 120, they could be looking at an output of over 7,000 megawatts.

[READ MORE: It's going to be a scorcher! Heat wave headed to Phoenix]

"Our highest ever was about 10 years ago in 2006," said Albert.

He says say if they ever get to the point where all the power generating stations in the Valley are maxed out, there are still other options; they can buy energy from other western states.

"About 15 years ago, California, particularly Southern California, had some real challenges and had rolling blackouts, and it really was a result of them not having the institutions in place and not planning ahead to serve customer demand,” said Albert. “We've been always doing this and always in a position to meet our customer demand."

APS says it has a duplicate power production and monitoring control room in a secret location in case something catastrophic happened to the main one. It says this way the company would still be able to deliver power as normal.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Extreme heat]

Looking ahead to next week, APS recommends if you can handle it, set your thermostat to 79 degrees, enough to keep you cool and your energy consumption at a minimum.

It also says hold off running any other major appliances during peak hours, noon to 7 p.m.

"So anything they can do there to cycle the pool pump a little bit more or shift the time they heat water and take showers and cook and wash and dry, things like that would be very helpful because those are the second- and third-biggest users in the household," said Jim Wontor, APS energy efficiency manager.

[RELATED: Home/auto experts offer advice on coping with extreme heat]

As uncomfortable 115 degrees and above feels for us, Albert says warm humid days, like during the monsoon, require much more energy than the hot dry days.

He says it’s because often the nighttime temps don’t drop as much during the monsoon, so our air conditioners run more and work harder to get the moisture out of the air.

[RELATED: Phoenix heat wave: Too hot to fly?]

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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