Allen murder trial day two: Jurors shown box 10-year-old was allegedly locked in

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A replica box is shown to the jury in addition to the actual container Ame Deal was allegedly locked inside. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A replica box is shown to the jury in addition to the actual container Ame Deal was allegedly locked inside. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Sammantha Allen is facing first-degree murder charges in the 2011 death of Ame Deal. (Source: Pool) Sammantha Allen is facing first-degree murder charges in the 2011 death of Ame Deal. (Source: Pool)
Ame Deal suffocated in a storage box and was found dead in 2011. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Ame Deal suffocated in a storage box and was found dead in 2011. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Sammantha Lucille Rebecca Allen. left, is accused of killing her little cousin, Ame Deal, in 2011. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 file photo) Sammantha Lucille Rebecca Allen. left, is accused of killing her little cousin, Ame Deal, in 2011. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 file photo)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

It was day two of the trial against a Valley woman accused of murdering her 10-year-old cousin.

Sammantha Allen is facing first-degree murder charges in the 2011 death of Ame Deal.

[RELATED: Murder trial of woman accused of locking child in box begins]

Tuesday in court, jurors saw the first evidence of what went on inside the family's home: photos of cluttered bedrooms and the container allegedly used to kill the child.

Prosecutors say six years ago, Allen padlocked Ame in the storage box as punishment for eating a popsicle.

Then they say Allen and her husband fell asleep without letting Ame out. Ame suffocated and was found dead the next morning.

[ORIGINAL STORY: Body of child found in container after hide-and-seek game (July 12, 2011)]

Responding detectives testified in court that they recorded the temperature inside that box after they found the lifeless girl and it was about 93 degrees.

Then prosecuting attorneys brought in an identical box to show the jury.

"When the lid is shut and latched, other than those holes, a very limited amount, except perhaps the hinges, and even that is quite closed, it would create a very semi-airtight container," said Reserve Det. Kenny Porter, now retired from the Phoenix Police Dept.

Allen, who turns 29 on Wednesday, is facing the death penalty if found guilty.

She maintains her innocence and originally claimed Ame died after tucking herself in the box in a game of hide and seek, as documented on police audio recordings.

"Ame has a tendency to fall asleep wherever she's hiding. She's done it several times," Allen told a police detective the day Ame died.

[RELATED: Ame Deal's mother talks about young girl's death (July 31, 2011)]

"How did you find out that Ame was in the toy box?" the detective asked.

"My 3-year-old found her," said Allen.  

Three other family members have already been convicted for abusing Ame and sentenced to prison. Next, Allen's husband, John Allen, will be tried in August. He, too, is facing a murder charge.

[READ MORE: 'Hide-and-seek' death ruled a homicide; 4 arrested (July 28, 2011)]

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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