Exploding hairspray can rips hole through Mesa woman's trash bin

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An empty aerosol can act like a rocket when it overheated and shot through the top of a Jan Duke’s garbage can. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) An empty aerosol can act like a rocket when it overheated and shot through the top of a Jan Duke’s garbage can. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The back of the can warns users not to store in temperatures over 120 degrees. Duke never thought that might include her back yard. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The back of the can warns users not to store in temperatures over 120 degrees. Duke never thought that might include her back yard. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
It was 107 degrees at the time, but the garbage can sitting in the direct sun in Duke’s yard was likely much hotter. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) It was 107 degrees at the time, but the garbage can sitting in the direct sun in Duke’s yard was likely much hotter. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Duke wasn’t standing nearby when it exploded, but she wonders what could have happened if she were. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Duke wasn’t standing nearby when it exploded, but she wonders what could have happened if she were. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Something many of us have in our bathrooms recently exploded at a Mesa woman’s house.

An empty aerosol can act like a rocket when it overheated and shot through the top of a Jan Duke’s garbage can on Tuesday.

It was 107 degrees at the time, but the garbage can sitting in the direct sun in Duke’s yard was likely much hotter.

“It was a big bang, it sounded like something fell," said Duke.  

The sound was likely caused by the flying can punching a hole in the lid, and ricocheting off her home’s metal gutter above.

“How does that do that?” asked Duke.  

Duke wasn’t standing nearby when it exploded, but she wonders what could have happened if she were.

“I think if it hit in the right angle, besides hitting your eye or breaking your nose, it probably could knock you out,” she said.  

Duke says thankfully this happened in an outdoor trash can, rather than in her car, where it could have done much more damage.

“Cars get just as hot, probably warmer,” said Duke. 

The back of the can warns users not to store in temperatures over 120 degrees. Duke never thought that might include her back yard.

“I never read my bottle labels. I know that common sense tells you that you’re not going to put it in extreme heat. This is just throwing your garbage away. Nobody thinks of it. But being in Arizona this time of year, you need to start thinking about these things. Because obviously, it does happen,” said Duke.

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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