Last year's fireball over Arizona now has a name: Dishchii'bikoh Ts'ilsoosé Tsee

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The fragments of the meteorite seen falling over eastern Arizona last year have been found now have a name. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The fragments of the meteorite seen falling over eastern Arizona last year have been found now have a name. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Since June 2, 2016, 15 fragments of that meteorite have been found and are being studied at ASU. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Since June 2, 2016, 15 fragments of that meteorite have been found and are being studied at ASU. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
One of the meteorite fragments found. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) One of the meteorite fragments found. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
TEMPE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Exactly one year ago, the night sky was lit up by a huge fireball falling over eastern Arizona.

Since then, 15 fragments of that meteorite have been found. They’re being studied at Arizona State University, and they now have a name.

[RELATED: NASA: Flash of light over Arizona sky was likely an asteroid; meteorites landed in southern AZ]

In the early hours of June 2, 2016, the meteor was caught on home security cameras, dash cams, and webcams across the state, burning bright as it hurtled toward the earth.

"You have to imagine there's something about 10 foot in diameter, the size of a small car traveling about 15 miles per second,” said Dr. Laurence Garvie, research professor and curator for the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies.

[RELATED: Meteorites from fireball seen over Arizona found]

The fragments landed on White Mountain Apache tribal land, near the town of Cibecue.

With the tribe’s permission, researchers set out to find it. It took them several days.

[RELATED: ASU granted special permission to search for meteorite]

Now, a handful of those space rocks are on permanent loan to ASU.

The tribe also gave the meteorites their unique name, Dishchii'bikoh Ts'ilsoosé Tsee, or 'Cibecue Star Stone' in English.

And with that, now the real research on the meteorites can begin.

"Each one is like a time capsule that tells us something about our early solar system. so it's our job as scientists to open these things up, look inside and try to decipher that information," said Garvie.  

Several of the fragments are on public display at the Center for Meteorite Studies on the ASU campus, 781 East Terrace Rd. You can come and see them for free during normal business hours.

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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

Click to learn more about Lauren.

Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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