Bee calls on the rise across the Valley

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Beekeepers Alex and Jon Young, from Abello's Bee removal, pulled a hive from a house in Scottsdale Tuesday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Beekeepers Alex and Jon Young, from Abello's Bee removal, pulled a hive from a house in Scottsdale Tuesday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
A large hive was uncovered Tuesday under the roof of a condominium in Ahwatukee. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A large hive was uncovered Tuesday under the roof of a condominium in Ahwatukee. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Another hive was recently found along a popular Phoenix hiking trail. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Another hive was recently found along a popular Phoenix hiking trail. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Bees are buzzing across the Valley, and they're making life miserable for some unhappy homeowners.

The number of bee related calls is on the rise in the Phoenix area.

Beekeepers Alex and Jon Young, from Abello's Bee removal, pulled a hive from a house in Scottsdale Tuesday, then moved on to get another one.

"Lots of eaves jobs, under shed floors, in walls, in trees," said Alex Young. "Just about anywhere."

The middle of May in Arizona is traditionally the time of year when the weather heats up and bees are the most active, and this year is no exception.

[RELATED: 30,000 bees set up honeycomb in north Phoenix attic]

A large hive was uncovered Tuesday under the roof of a condominium in Ahwatukee.

Another hive was recently found along a popular Phoenix hiking trail.

Aaron Becerri works for "The BeeMan."

He said that one of the biggest mistakes homeowners make is having someone come out and destroy the bees without taking the hive.

Not only is it harmful to the environment, chances are that your bee problem will come back, Bercerri said.

[RELATED: Bees begin to buzz the Valley]

"If we don't take that hive out, the problem is still going to be there," said Becerri. "You might take the bees, but that doesn't mean there won't be eggs in there."

According to Valley beekeepers, about 80 percent of the bees in the Valley are the more aggressive Africanized bees.

"Obviously, if you go and attack them, and throw stuff at them, throw water at them, they're going to go crazy and they will be a problem," said Becerri. "But if you let them be, they're going to be doing their own thing."

[READ MORE: Bees are endangered -- what does this mean for humans?]

Removing a bee hive properly and saving the bees is more expensive than simply killing the bees or calling the fire department.

A beekeeper can charge anywhere from $100 to several thousand dollars.

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