Settlement ends long-running dispute over Glendale casino

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Tribal leaders gather on Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 to sign a new gaming agreement. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Tribal leaders gather on Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 to sign a new gaming agreement. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
GLENDALE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

According to a press release from Governor Doug Ducey's office sent on Wednesday morning, the state and the Tohono O’odham Nation have reached an agreement on the new Desert Diamond Casino in Glendale

[RELATED: State to block approval for new Glendale tribal casino]

Arizona had refused to grant the casino full gambling permits citing that the tribe committed fraud by concealing their plan to build a casino in the Phoenix area. 

[READ MORE: Glendale-area tribal casino opens without license]

The Tohono O'odham Nation disagreed, saying federal law allows the casino. A federal judge previously said that a trial would need to be held to make a decision regarding the dispute. 

[RELATED: Judge says lawsuit over Glendale casino to head to trial]

The tribe and the state have now settled on an agreement without going to trial. The state has agreed to process and certify Class II and Class III gaming permits and a liquor license for the casino. 

[READ MORE: Ducey offers tribe OK to expand Glendale casino games]

In exchange, the tribe has agreed not to conduct Class II or Class III gaming anywhere else in a designated geographical area that includes metropolitan Phoenix during the term of the agreement. 

“This agreement is a major victory for Arizona, one that ensures that there are meaningful restrictions on additional casinos in the greater-Phoenix-metro area," Ducey said. 

As part of the agreement, the State and the Nation will amend their existing compact to confirm that the Nation may conduct Class III gaming at one gaming facility on its West Valley land, but nowhere else within the designated geographical area.

“This is a day the Nation has long been working toward. It establishes an agreement concerning the Nation’s right to conduct Class III gaming on its West Valley land and it brings to an end the final dispute that was constraining this important project," said Edward D. Manuel, Tohono O’odham Nation Chairman.

The agreement ends the last pending lawsuit over the West Valley casino without any further legislative or legal action.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

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