Preparing your tires for the Valley heat

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there are simple steps every motorist can take to make sure their tires are prepared for the heat. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) there are simple steps every motorist can take to make sure their tires are prepared for the heat. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Experts said cracking and bubbles are cause for concern. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Experts said cracking and bubbles are cause for concern. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
To check the tread, just insert the penny into the tread head first, and if too much of Lincoln’s head can be seen, it’s time to trash the tire. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) To check the tread, just insert the penny into the tread head first, and if too much of Lincoln’s head can be seen, it’s time to trash the tire. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Experts suggest ignoring the PSI stamped on the tire and instead follow the recommended PSI listed on a placard posted right inside your car door. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Experts suggest ignoring the PSI stamped on the tire and instead follow the recommended PSI listed on a placard posted right inside your car door. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

As extreme heat creeps up in the Valley, it’s time to take measures to prevent dangerous tire blow-outs on the road.

The Department of Public Safety says a driver experienced a blowout Wednesday morning, veered right and hit another vehicle before going up an embankment and diving into a canal.  It happened on Loop 202 westbound near the Dobson Road exit. 

The driver managed to crawl out of the car and walk away without serious injuries.

[READ MORE: Vehicle ends up in Chandler canal after tire failure]

Jay Simmons, the manager at Discount Tire, says there are simple steps every motorist can take to make sure their tires are prepared for the heat.

The bottom line is if something doesn’t look right, have an expert check it out.

"Tires have oils in them, and as the tires age the oils get drawn out of that tire, and they start getting that cracking,” says Simmons.

He says cracking and bubbles are cause for concern.

Simmons uses a device to check tread levels, but he says anyone can use a penny to look for low tread. Just insert the penny into the tread head first, and if too much of Lincoln’s head can be seen, it’s time to trash the tire.

While too little air in the tires is troublesome, so is having too much. Simmons suggests ignoring the PSI stamped on the tire and instead follow the recommended PSI listed on a placard posted right inside your car door.

“That’s what we base it off of. That's what the vehicle manufacturers feel is the best vehicle's performance for fuel mileage and tire wear,” says Simmons.

Simmons says a driver can sometimes feel a bad tire in motion.

“Stopping distance is definitely a concern,” says Simmons. “When your tires get worn you're going to notice your tires don’t react as quick.”

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