California bill would allow bicyclists to roll through stop signs

Posted: Updated:
Under a new California bill, if the coast is clear, the bicycle rider can skip a full stop. (Source: CBS) Under a new California bill, if the coast is clear, the bicycle rider can skip a full stop. (Source: CBS)
In Arizona, the law says that a bicyclist must come to a complete stop at intersections with stop signs and red lights. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) In Arizona, the law says that a bicyclist must come to a complete stop at intersections with stop signs and red lights. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
SACRAMENTO, CA (3TV/CBS 5) -

A measure in the California State Assembly would give bicyclists the green light to roll through stop signs.

Under the legislation, if the coast is clear, the bicycle rider can skip a full stop. 

"This is just a judgment call on behalf of the bicyclist," Assemblyman Jay Obernolte, a Republican from Bear Lake, said.

The sponsor believes it'll cut down on crashes and make riding a bicycle more efficient.

"You're not stopping at every block," Jim Brown, executive director of the Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates, said.

The bill is based on an Idaho law adopted in 1982. A study showed bicycling crashes in Boise were 30 percent lower than in other similar-sized cities in the U.S.

Supporters said the measure will make the road safer but critics called it an accident waiting to happen.

"My concern is even if you don't see anybody there doesn't mean there won't be somebody there and if you just fly right through somebody could just, smack! You know?" one resident said.

Obernolte said the measure will limit the amount of time bicyclists have to spend at intersections.

"Because of that they're exposed twice as long to unseen vehicular traffic which is the No. 1 cause of bicycling accidents," Obernolte said.

The bill is scheduled to be heard before a committee on Monday.

In Arizona, the law says that a bicyclist must come to a complete stop at intersections with stop signs and red lights.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.