New policy allows for naming rights at downtown park

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The city's Parks and Recreation Board created a new policy to allow for sponsorships for Margaret T. Hance Park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The city's Parks and Recreation Board created a new policy to allow for sponsorships for Margaret T. Hance Park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
One of the designs for the upgraded Hance Park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) One of the designs for the upgraded Hance Park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The City of Phoenix wants to make $135 millions in upgrades for the downtown Phoenix park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The City of Phoenix wants to make $135 millions in upgrades for the downtown Phoenix park. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
While they have various levelsfor sponsoring places within the park, in order to get the naming rights it would have to be a large amount of money. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) While they have various levelsfor sponsoring places within the park, in order to get the naming rights it would have to be a large amount of money. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

For the right price, your name or your company's name can grace a place at Margaret T. Hance Park in downtown Phoenix.

The city's Parks and Recreation Board created a new policy to allow for sponsorships.

"This is a way to help fund this iconic park, by asking our private partners to help us finance this iconic new vision," said Judy Weiss, deputy director of Parks and Recreation.

Their vision is laid out in a Master Plan. It includes major upgrades to the 32-acre park like a skate park, performance pavilion and restaurants.

"We estimate it to be $135 million," Weiss said.

That's their projected cost for everything.

As of right now though, the City of Phoenix only has $15 million in public funds set aside for the overhaul over the next three years, hence the sponsorship policy.

"If they choose to donate or sponsor really in a very significant way they could if they wish, and they may not, but they could maybe have their name on whatever it is they're funding," said Weiss.

While they have various levels for sponsoring places within the park, in order to get the naming rights it would have to be a large amount of money.

"Maybe a rule of thumb would be more than 50 percent of what the project costs," Weiss said.

The city is working with the Phoenix Community Alliance and the Hance Park Conservancy on this effort. Weiss says they'll handle the bulk of the fundraising efforts.

"I think it's a good idea," said James Peckenham. "As long as the money is for the naming rights and it goes to support the development of the park but it doesn't change the nature of the park."

With regards to who can apply for sponsorships, the city says they will not consider, alcohol, tobacco or sex-oriented businesses. That's something people we talked to felt was appropriate.

"You definitely want to put some restrictions because it is a public space," said Mario Casillas. "There will be children and sensitive persons that you don't want to have anything disparaging."

The name of the park itself is not up for a sponsorship. It will remain Hance Park, which made people feel even more comfortable with the idea.

"I think it's definitely important to keep that, with the first female elected mayor of Phoenix, need to keep the history if it," said Riobard Smith.

Right now, sponsorships are only being considered for Hance Park. Weiss said they plan to have more information on how people can get involved in the coming weeks.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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