Pastor at immigration march:'They're the kind of people we want as neighbors'

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A group of people marched in downtown Phoenix for immigrants' rights. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A group of people marched in downtown Phoenix for immigrants' rights. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Protesters say they are upset over the Trump administration for going after illegal immigrants. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Protesters say they are upset over the Trump administration for going after illegal immigrants. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Marchers said President Donald Trump's policies criminalize even non-violent immigrants. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Marchers said President Donald Trump's policies criminalize even non-violent immigrants. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The demonstrators dressed in white said they want to see an end to deportations. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The demonstrators dressed in white said they want to see an end to deportations. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

A group of people spent the night at the capitol Sunday, saying with the new presidential administration, too many resources are being spent on targeting non-violent immigrants. 

"We are getting reports every day. We are getting calls all the time about individuals who need help," said Petra Falcon with Promise Arizona.

She said Sunday's movement was called "The Children's March" for good reason. 

"These children are the ones who are impacted," Falcon said. "Their mothers and fathers are being deported."

Starting at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Phoenix and making a stop at City Hall before ending at the state Capitol, the demonstrators dressed in white said they want to see an end to deportations. 

"The new administration has decided to criminalize everybody," said Ken Heintzelman with the Shadow Rock United Church of Christ in Phoenix.

He said he believes President Donald Trump's policies criminalize even non-violent immigrants. 

"Instead of maintaining priorities, that is sending limited resources after people that are violent and harm our communities, unfortunately, families are being torn apart, fathers and mothers taken away, children left orphaned," he said.

"Today and across the country today and tomorrow, there are hundreds of people sending that message we are not giving up," Falcon said. 

"They are our brothers, our sisters, our neighbors and they should be here because they're the kind of people we want as neighbors," Heintzelman said. 

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