Closing arguments set at trial of accused NAU shooter Steven Jones

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Jones is charged with Colin Brough's murder and the assaults of three other fraternity brothers in the October 2015 campus shooting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Jones is charged with Colin Brough's murder and the assaults of three other fraternity brothers in the October 2015 campus shooting. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
FLAGSTAFF, AZ (AP) -

Lawyers are scheduled Tuesday to make closing arguments at the trial of a former Northern Arizona University student charged with murder and assault for fatally shooting one student and wounding three others.

Steven Jones contends that he fired his handgun in self-defense after being punched in the face by intoxicated people during a confrontation in October 2015 near the university's campus in Flagstaff.

[Special section: NAU shooting]

Prosecutors argue Jones wasn't justified in using lethal force and portrayed him as the aggressor who chose to introduce the gun into an argument. They said he could have walked away from the fight without resorting to gunfire.

The shooting killed Colin Brough and wounded Nicholas Piring, Nicholas Prato and Kyle Zeintek.

It occurred after Jones and two friends were walking from an early morning party and stopped at an apartment complex.

Jones said he was accosted by a drunken group of strangers, was punched in the face, chased by some members of the group and ran to his vehicle, where he retrieved a handgun.

Jones said he went back toward the group and fired his gun but didn't mean to hurt anyone. He testified he fired several shots "to stop the immediate threat that was coming at me."

Prosecutors insist that Jones' actions were premeditated.

[RELATED: Prosecution rests its case in NAU shooting trial of Steven Jones (April 20, 2017)]

None of the victims was armed.

Zientek, who lost a kidney and part of his intestine due to his injuries, had testified that he tried to run away moments before he was shot twice in the back.

Jones, who is now 20, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder and aggravated assault charges.

Prosecutors didn't seek the death penalty. A first-degree murder conviction carries a maximum penalty of life in prison.

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