Valley drivers get ready for series of closures along I-10 in west Valley

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Sections of I-10 will close during next two years for construction of new interchange to connect to South Mountain Freeway. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Sections of I-10 will close during next two years for construction of new interchange to connect to South Mountain Freeway. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
A series of I-10 closures between 51st Avenue and 67th Avenue will begin at 11 p.m. Tuesday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A series of I-10 closures between 51st Avenue and 67th Avenue will begin at 11 p.m. Tuesday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The 22-mile South Mountain Freeway project will bridge the west Valley to the East Valley. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The 22-mile South Mountain Freeway project will bridge the west Valley to the East Valley. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Tuesday night's closure is necessary so ADOT can move some big construction cranes across the freeway, said ADOT. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Tuesday night's closure is necessary so ADOT can move some big construction cranes across the freeway, said ADOT. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Traffic has been moving along just fine along Interstate 10 in the west Valley, but that will change Tuesday night.

A series of I-10 closures between 51st Avenue and 67th Avenue will begin at 11 p.m. and motorists are not happy about it.

"I just moved here, and I left New York, which has a horrible traffic problem," said Darryl Jackson. "I'm not looking forward to it."

"Yeah, it will be more difficult," said Terrance Thorn. "A lot of cars."

"It's frustrating, but there's not much I can do about it," said Siena Lopez. "If they close the freeway for construction, they close it."

The closures will take place, on and off, for the next two years, while Arizona's Department of Transportation crews build an interchange and new stretch of highway to connect I-10 with the new South Mountain Freeway.

The 22-mile project will bridge the west Valley to the East Valley.

ADOT spokesman Dustin Krugel said they're doing their best make the disruptions to drivers as minimal as possible while construction is underway.

"With a roadway as important as I-10, we have so many travelers on I-10. We have to be very careful when we schedule the closures," said Krugel. "That's why we try to schedule closures when they have the least amount of traffic impact."

Tuesday night's closure is necessary so ADOT can move some big construction cranes across the freeway, said Krugel.

Jaspreet Javra, of Phoenix, said that the inconvenience is only temporary.

"It's a problem, but it's for the betterment of the future and the people living here," said Java. "It will be better having a new freeway."

Overhead message signs, weekly traffic alerts and media news releases all help promote any future closures we have related to the South Mountain Freeway construction.

Motorists can learn about future closures by checking weekly updates on traffic alerts from the 3TV and CBS 5 mobile apps.

Alerts are available by signing up at SouthMountainFreeway.com.

The public can receive these notices via email or text messages. 

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Jason Barry
Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

Click to learn more about Jason.

Jason Barry

Jason Barry has been reporting in the Valley since 1997.

He is a nine-time Rocky Mountain Emmy Award winner who is best known for his weekly Dirty Dining reports, which highlight local restaurants with major health code violations.

Jason was born in Los Angeles and graduated from the University of Miami.

An avid sports fan, Jason follows the Diamondbacks, Cardinals and Suns with his wife, Karen, and son, Joshua.

His favorite stories to cover are the station’s Pay it Forward segments, which reward members of the community with $500 for going ‘above and beyond’ the call of duty to help others.

Jason, started his career at WBTW-TV in Florence, SC before moving to WALA-TV in Mobile, AL, was named the Associated Press Reporter of the Year in 2002.

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