Phoenix launches new website to sell excess city owned properties

Posted: Updated:
The City of Phoenix has launched a new website to get rid of pieces of land. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The City of Phoenix has launched a new website to get rid of pieces of land. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
As part of an effort to take stock of the city's property and assets, they discovered several hundred properties they don't need to own. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) As part of an effort to take stock of the city's property and assets, they discovered several hundred properties they don't need to own. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
From vacant lots to commercial buildings even single family homes, the city has a lot of hot listings in desirable areas and anyone can get in on the action. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) From vacant lots to commercial buildings even single family homes, the city has a lot of hot listings in desirable areas and anyone can get in on the action. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The City says this program is a win, win for everyone. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The City says this program is a win, win for everyone. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

The City of Phoenix is trying to unload a lot of excess property through a newly launched website.

"It's a new thing for us to be intentional about what we have and making it available in one place for people," said Phoenix City Manager Ed Zuercher.

As part of an effort to take stock of the city's property and assets, they discovered several hundred properties they don't need to own.

"These range from very large parcels of land, multiple acres to some smaller parcels that were left over when we built a road," said Phoenix City Councilwoman Kate Gallego.

From vacant lots to commercial buildings even single family homes, the city has a lot of hot listings in desirable areas and anyone can get in on the action.

"We have parcels in downtown. That's very hot right now. Everyone wants to be downtown so we expect a fair amount of competition for that," Gallego said.

The City says this is a win, win for everyone.

"We don't have to maintain it. We get revenue for it and on an on-going basis we'll get property taxes for it," said Zuercher.

Thus far, they say the project has been very successful with the city earning more than $17 million from selling properties.

Gallego says in some cases the City accumulated these properties to help clean up neighborhood eyesores pre-recession.

"The neighbors were happy when we got rid of the blight but they're getting a little bit frustrated that we hadn't sold more land by now," she said.

In what she describes as difficult budget times, Gallego says it's important they, "maximize all of the property and assets the city owns."

To find out more about the city's efforts click/tap here.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


  • Social Connect

  • Contact

    AZ Family

Amanda GoodmanAmanda Goodman joined Arizona’s Family in May 2014.

Click to learn more about Amanda.

Amanda Goodman

The Yuma native and ASU Walter Cronkite School graduate is delighted to be back home in Arizona.

Goodman started her career in St. George, Utah, working at an independent station. While there, she was able to do a little bit of everything from reporting to anchoring to shooting her own video and even producing.

From there, she headed east to West Virginia, working at the No. 1 station in the Huntington, Charleston market, WSAZ-TV.

Before returning to Arizona, Goodman spent the past three years at KRQE-TV in Albuquerque. During her time there, she covered many high-profile, stories including the murder trial of a former Albuquerque police officer, the Las Conchas wildfire that threatened Los Alamos National Lab, and the massive Wallow Fire that made its way into New Mexico from Arizona.

When she’s not reporting and tweeting, Goodman spends a lot of her free time hanging out with family and friends.

She also loves to travel and has been to four, soon to be five, continents.

Goodman is so excited to be back home and can’t wait to share some of your stories.

Hide bio