Syrian refugee calls on the American people for help following chemical attack in Idlib

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Before the war, Zuhir Aljundi, his wife and children lived in Idlib, which is where a suspected chemical attack happened. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Before the war, Zuhir Aljundi, his wife and children lived in Idlib, which is where a suspected chemical attack happened. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
A suspected chemical attack has left around 60 people dead and hundreds hurt in Syria. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A suspected chemical attack has left around 60 people dead and hundreds hurt in Syria. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

A suspected chemical attack has left around 60 people dead and hundreds hurt in Syria.

Witnesses say Russian or Syrian government jets carried out the attack. Both deny any involvement, instead blaming the rebels.

It's unclear what substance was used against the Syrian people, but doctors say it was worse than previous chemical attacks.

The UN Security Council is holding an emergency meeting on Wednesday.

[READ MORE: Suspected chemical attack in Syria kills at least 58 civilians]

The City of Idlib, where this attack happened, has been suffering for years from war with many families choosing to flee a long time ago.

Before the war, Zuhir Aljundi, his wife and children lived in Idlib.  

"They had a house. They had a good life everything was fine except no freedom," said Syrian refugee advocate Steve Arkawi, translating for Aljundi.

Aljundi says it got worse. They experienced harassment from soldiers, then lost their home in a bombing.

"He was worried about his kids, more than his worry about himself. He wanted a good future for the kids,” Arkawi translated.

Aljundi packed up his family and started walking a three-day journey to Turkey. After three years of waiting, the family of seven was placed in Phoenix nine months ago.

They say they’re safe now but watch helplessly from half a world away as the killings continue.

"His people are dying, children dying, and nothing he can do," said Arkawi. "The regime is a brutal regime. It's a criminal regime, and it should be stopped."

Ajundi says he has a message for those he believes do have the power.

"Call your Congressman, call your Senator, call the White House. Tell them stop the atrocities in Syria. Save the children, please. Every American person should call. We need awareness of what's going on in Syria," he said.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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Lauren ReimerLauren Reimer joined the 3TV/CBS 5 family in June 2016. She is originally from Racine, WI but is no stranger to our heat.

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Lauren Reimer

She previously worked for KVOA in Tucson, covering topics that matter to Arizonans including the monsoon, wildfires and border issues. During the child migrant crisis of 2014, Reimer was one of only a handful of journalists given access to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility in Nogales, where hundreds of unaccompanied children were being held after crossing into the U.S. from Central America. Before that, Reimer worked at WREX in Rockford, IL. Lauren is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and still visits home often. When not chasing news stories, Reimer loves to explore, enjoying everything from trying new adventurous foods to visiting state and national parks or local places of historical significance.

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