Protecting vehicles from theft using device from Valley company

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Ravelco Phoenix offers a device it says will keep your car safe and sound. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Ravelco Phoenix offers a device it says will keep your car safe and sound. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Installation takes a couple of hours and will set you back $499. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Installation takes a couple of hours and will set you back $499. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

Arizona has a come a long way in reducing the number of auto thefts across the state but there is still work to be done.

The most recently available statistics show that on average more than 40 vehicles are stolen each day in our state.

"Almost everybody is going to know somebody who has had their car stolen at one time or another," said Mike McCarter.

McCarter manages Ravelco Phoenix, which offers a device he says will keep your car safe and sound.

"All it does is prevent people from being able to start and drive your car off when you're not in it," McCarter said.

Installation takes a couple of hours and will set you back $499.

"We install wiring that attaches to two different systems in your engine, one that makes it not run, one that makes it not start. That's all attached to a little socket in or under your dashboard," McCarter said.

They walked us through how it works once it's in place.

"Basically you just put the plug into the socket. It only goes in one way and after that just like normal go ahead and start your car up. When you try to use it without the plug it won't crank," he said.

The company itself has been around for decades but only recently reestablished service in the Valley.

"In 40 years no vehicle with a properly installed and used Ravelco has ever been stolen," said McCarter.

While they claim a 100 percent success rate, there is on caveat which McCarter did not shy away from.

"Nothing is theft proof. There's no such thing. This will get you as close as we can possibly get you. Nobody is going to take it, short of getting it up on a flatbed," he said.

If the price tag is too high, Phoenix police say simple things like a club for your steering wheel, VIN etching, even just remembering to make sure your doors are locked are all good deterrents. 

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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