Window shot in Avondale sparks debate over gun bill

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It was a close call for a west Valley family who found a bullet hole in one of their bedroom window. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) It was a close call for a west Valley family who found a bullet hole in one of their bedroom window. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
The bullet came in through the upstairs window but didn't hurt anyone. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) The bullet came in through the upstairs window but didn't hurt anyone. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Police told the homeowner it likely came from about a mile away from a gun fired straight into the air. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Police told the homeowner it likely came from about a mile away from a gun fired straight into the air. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
They found the bullet lying on the carpet in the same room the homeowner's grandchildren often play. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) They found the bullet lying on the carpet in the same room the homeowner's grandchildren often play. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
AVONDALE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

It was a close call for a west Valley family who found a bullet hole in one of their upstairs windows.

It happened sometime between 10:30 p.m. on Saturday and 3 a.m. on Sunday in the area of El Mirage and Camelback roads.

Wanda Bradshaw, the woman who lived in the Avondale home, says police told her it likely came from about a mile away from a gun fired straight into the air.

They found the bullet lying on the carpet in the same room her grandchildren often play. No one was hurt. 

"If that would have happened during the day, that could have killed one of my kids," said Bradshaw.  

The incident comes as some state lawmakers are deciding whether or not to weaken Shannon's Law, the law that makes it a felony to fire a gun into the air in celebration or at random.

The Legislature passed Shannon's Law in 2000 after 14-year-old Shannon Smith was killed in her backyard by a stray bullet.

Earlier this month, a Senate committee approved changes to House Bill 2287. Rep. Tony Rivera, a Republican from Peoria, says he wrote the proposal to protect lawful gun owners from being charged for accidentally firing their weapons.

"We own a couple guns and we're very responsible," said Bradshaw. "It's not accidental when you shoot them up in the air. I'm sorry it's intentional." 

The measure still needs the full approval of the Senate and the governor's signature before it becomes law.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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