Yarn bombing takes Arcadia neighborhood by surprise

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(Source: 3TV/CBS 5) (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
(Source: 3TV/CBS 5) (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
(Source: 3TV/CBS 5) (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
(Source: 3TV/CBS 5) (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
ARCADIA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

A popular park pathway in Arcadia has some new, temporary art covering some its trees and light poles. The area was "yarn bombed" by a group of neighbors just before Valentines Day.  

"I think it makes it look nice," said neighbor Gene Rufer.

The colorful crochet art was created by some neighbors and installed along the pathway of the Cross Cut Canal Park on 48th Street just south of Indian School Road.

"The idea was, what if we could get a group together and create public art for people to enjoy in our neighborhood," Meredith Stewart said.

Stewart was one of the organizers behind the yarn bomb.

"Unlike spray painting, it doesn't cause any damage, doesn't cause damage to any trees, any benches or anything. It's easy to remove," said Stewart.

It's the second year they've done it but last year their impressive stitching work didn't last long. It was removed fairly quickly after they put it up.

This year, they wanted to be able to keep it up so they reached out to the City of Phoenix ahead of time.

"I contacted them, asked if we could have permission to put it up and she said yes, we could put it up for about three weeks," said Stewart.

The Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department says while this type of display is neither technically permitted or encouraged, they wanted to work with the neighbors and come to a compromise. It's similar to the agreement they were able to work out with the group seeking to keep the Christmas tree on Camelback. 

[READ MORE: Group gets OK to put a Christmas tree atop Phoenix mountain]

All of the yarn, blankets and materials they used to wrap the trees, light poles and the bench must be taken down by March 6.

"It's a happy medium I guess, ya know. I understand rules and regulations but sometimes I think we just beat ourselves about those things," said neighbor Sandy Trudeaux. 

"This is simply fun, whimsical and just to add a smile, that's it," Stewart said.

Walkers, joggers and dog walkers our crew talked to on the pathway all seemed to be in agreement, they absolutely love the yarn bombing.

"I think it's pretty cool," said Kat Stokes. "I run by here in the mornings and see it and its just kind of my boost of encouragement in the mornings."

With time winding down, neighbors plan to soak up the temporary display until the end.

"When I walk down here it feels like somebody just wraps their arms around me and it's just love," Trudeaux said.

Once they remove all the pieces, Stewart says they plan to hang onto them for their next, yet to be determined project.

She also said that if people want to weigh-in on the idea of yarn bombing in other Phoenix neighborhoods, they should reach out to the Parks and Recreation Department.

"It has to be simple because it has to happen quickly so we just use very simple stitches with yarn," Stewart said.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


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