House panel to consider red light camera, photo radar ban

Posted: Updated:
A bill that would ban photo speed and red light enforcement passed a House committee. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) A bill that would ban photo speed and red light enforcement passed a House committee. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
There have been attempts to ban photo radar and red light cameras for the past several years in the Legislature but they failed. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) There have been attempts to ban photo radar and red light cameras for the past several years in the Legislature but they failed. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Lawmakers won a small victory last year by banning photo radar use on state highways. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Lawmakers won a small victory last year by banning photo radar use on state highways. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (AP) -

An Arizona House committee on Wednesday voted to advance a measure that would ban photo speed and red light enforcement, the latest in a yearslong effort by opponents of photo radar to end the practice in the state.

Rep. Travis Grantham, R-Gilbert, is the main sponsor of House Bill 2525. He called the use of the devices a constitutional violation.

"We're fostering a police state when you can violate a civil ordinance by a fraction of a second," Grantham said. "Then you have no ability to argue in front of your accuser as to why that might have happened...that's not what our representative Constitutional republic is built around."

[RELATED: Photo radar ban emerges again in Arizona Legislature]

Opponents of the measure testified that photo radar helps ensure safe driving and that citations are consistently reviewed by law enforcement before being issued.

Stan Barnes, a representative from red light camera provider American Traffic Solutions who spoke against the legislation, contested the belief the devices call citizens' constitutional rights into question.

"An officer of the law decides based on evidence that you violated the law and you get a ticket in the mail," Barnes said during the House Appropriations Committee hearing. "The ones that contest that, they go to court and a machine does not show up. An officer shows up and says 'I reviewed the tape.'"

Paradise Valley Police Chief Peter Wingert also testified against the measure and said the devices help with the flow of traffic.

"Photo enforcement in Paradise Valley works very effectively because we're not jamming up the roadway with the black and whites while we're making traffic stops."

The House committee voted 9-5 to send the measure to the full House.

There have been attempts to ban photo radar and red light cameras for the past several years in the Legislature but they failed.

The effort typically splits majority Republicans, with those backing cities' efforts to cut down on speeding sparring with others who view the devices as either a Constitutional violation or simply unfair to drivers.

Lawmakers won a small victory last year by banning photo radar use on state highways.

© 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


  • Social Connect

  • Contact

    AZ Family