U.S. DOT turning to social media to push Congress to fix failing infrastructure

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U.S. DOT announced Monday that it's putting pressure on elected leaders with the hashtag #ShowUsYourInfraWear. (Source: KPHO/KTVK) U.S. DOT announced Monday that it's putting pressure on elected leaders with the hashtag #ShowUsYourInfraWear. (Source: KPHO/KTVK)
(Source: Twitter) (Source: Twitter)
(Source: Twitter) (Source: Twitter)
MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Tired of potholes, ripped up streets or bumpy bridges in your town? Now you can take your traffic issues right to the top with social media.

Instead of passing a long-term plan to fund our failing infrastructure, critics, including those in the trucking industry, say Congress has decided to kick the can down the road.

Monday, it certainly felt hot enough to melt rubber. But auto experts say jacked-up roads actually damage tires the most.

"Tires go through rigorous bouts of training, so the heat is negligible," explained Sean Hortan, a manager at a Phoenix Community Tire location. "It's really the condition of the roads that would cause issues with the tires."

RELATED: Damaged roads costing motorists hundreds of dollars a year

The U.S. Department of Transportation says we can all do the nation's infrastructure and, by extension, our vehicles a big favor in the month of August.

"People take our infrastructure for granted," said Tony Bradley, president of the Arizona Truckers Association. "I think it's good to show the problems."

U.S. DOT announced Monday that it's putting pressure on elected leaders with the hashtag #ShowUsYourInfraWear. In other words, take a picture of aging, deteriorating roads and bridges, and then Tweet or Instagram it using the hashtag and U.S. DOT handle, @USDOT.

SOCIAL: @USDOT on Twitter | @USDOT on Instgram

"We do have these infrastructure needs in Arizona that need to be addressed," Bradley said.

The campaign comes after transportation officials called out Congress for passing a three-month, short-term extension to crucial highway funding. Then Congress left for August recess. How crucial is that funding? Arizona gets 70 percent of its highway funding from the federal government.

"It's sad that that is one of the responsibilities that they have is highway funding," Bradley added.

If you need proof of failing infrastructure, just remember that bridge on I-10 that collapsed a couple of weeks ago. That closure cost about $2.5 billion -- per day.

"This is an opportunity for the public to say, 'Here's a problem that I see every day,'" Bradley said. "'Policymakers, please take a look.'"

A 2013 inventory found there are 716 bridges in Arizona using outdated standards and old design features. But the government says they are still safe.

Copyright 2015 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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