Media seeks camera coverage of Arias retrial

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By Mike Gertzman By Mike Gertzman

PHOENIX (AP) -- Video footage of Jodi Arias' Sept. 29 penalty phase retrial should be allowed to be broadcast 30 minutes after the end of each day's proceedings to afford the public their constitutional right to witness criminal trials, a media lawyer argued Monday.

Arias was convicted of murder last year in the 2008 killing of her ex-boyfriend at his suburban Phoenix home, but jurors couldn't decide on her sentence. The retrial will determine if she gets the death penalty or life in prison.

Arias' first trial was broadcast live, but Judge Sherry Stephens denied that right this time around, ruling that no footage could be broadcast until after the verdict.

Several local television stations are arguing that Stephens' ruling is too restrictive and creates constitutional violations.

"For many people, access to the day's proceedings ... will be their only means of attending trial which is their constitutional right," media lawyer David Bodney told the judge.

Prosecutor Juan Martinez did not object, noting that Arias has sought media coverage herself, offering interviews before, during and after the trial, and that the defense is just seeking "to manage or attempt to control what's going out on the air waves."

Arias' attorneys argue the less restrictive media rules would hamper her right to a fair trial.

Defense lawyer Kirk Nurmi said that the motion is simply a desire by the media "to exploit this trial for profit."

The defense called no witnesses during Arias' first penalty phase, in part because her attorneys said some had been threatened and refused to testify.

If the judge amends her ruling and allows footage to be broadcast at the end of each day, Nurmi argued, some witnesses may "be harassed and threatened in the evening and may not want to come back."

The judge did not immediately rule.

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Arias due back in court ahead of penalty retrial; auctioning 'piece of history'

PHOENIX (AP) -- Jodi Arias is due back in court for a hearing ahead of her planned Sept. 29 penalty phase retrial.

The trial had been scheduled to begin last week, but a judge allowed a postponement after Arias decided she wanted to represent herself. Arias has since given up her right to serve as her own attorney and instead will allow her court-appointed lawyers to handle the case.

She is set for court Monday morning. Media lawyers will also argue again for live camera coverage of the retrial.

Arias was convicted of murder last year in the 2008 killing of her ex-boyfriend at his suburban Phoenix home, but jurors couldn't reach a decision on her sentence. The retrial will determine if she gets the death penalty or life in prison. 

Arias puts 'piece of history' up for auction

Arias has been selling her artwork online for quite some time, but she just launched a new auction that features something different -- the glasses she wore while testifying in 2013.

The glasses are described as "a one-of-a-kind piece of history."

The opening bid is $500. A $250 deposit is required to place a bid. According to JodiArias.com, proceeds from the auction "will go to a Phoenix-based non-profit."

The auction opened Sunday and ends at midnight on Wednesday, Sept. 24.