Ride-share bill moving through Ariz. legislature

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By Matthew Seeman By Matthew Seeman
By Matthew Seeman By Matthew Seeman
By Matthew Seeman By Matthew Seeman
By Matthew Seeman By Matthew Seeman
By Matthew Seeman By Matthew Seeman

PHOENIX -- A lot of people who need lifts are turning to ride-sharing services like Lyft and Uber. But these services can come with certain dangers, and the Arizona state legislature is looking to pass a bill that would regulate ride-sharing.

To get a ride from Uber or Lyft, customers can use their smartphones and program their payment information ahead of time to make the experience more convenient than a standard taxi.

Arizona House Bill 2273 would require ride-sharing companies to register with corporation commissions, to limit the number of passengers per vehicle, and to mandate annual safety inspections.

But some critics say these regulations do not go far enough to protect passengers. Linda Gorman from Triple-A Arizona explained that, unlike taxis, drivers for ride-shares lack commercial insurance. Each driver has a personal policy, which would not cover anyone using the service, including the drivers themselves.

Accidents have already occurred, Gorman said, and drivers are suing the companies as a result.

Uber and a driver are being sued after the driver struck and killed 6-year-old girl in San Francisco on New Year’s Eve while in between fares. The driver only had personal insurance coverage, and though he did not have a passenger in his car at the time of the accident, his insurance company said he was available for hire and refused to cover him.

HB2273 should contain a provision requiring commercial insurance coverage to kick in for any driver who signs into the service and becomes available for hire, she said.

"The undue burden is on the motorists," Gorman said, "and Triple-A believes that’s simply not good enough."