Wildflowers bring spectacular views to Phoenix desert

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Wildflower blooms at the Las Lomitas trail at South Mountain Park & Preserve. By Mike Gertzman Wildflower blooms at the Las Lomitas trail at South Mountain Park & Preserve. By Mike Gertzman
Sonoran Preserve in North Phoenix By Mike Gertzman Sonoran Preserve in North Phoenix By Mike Gertzman
By Mike Gertzman By Mike Gertzman
By Mike Gertzman By Mike Gertzman
By Mike Gertzman By Mike Gertzman

PHOENIX -- It is the perfect time of year to see some beautiful spring wildflower blooms close to home. The Phoenix Desert Preserve system is bright with spring color after the many fall and winter rains the Valley has been showered with.

The City of Phoenix says this year’s wildflower displays are expected to be the Valley’s best in years. Residents interested in seeing the displays can do so more easily with an online guide provided by the Phoenix Parks and Recreation Department.

Both South Mountain Park preserve and the Sonoran Preserve have numerous trails that offer wildflower blooms. Those trails are listed along with the various wildflowers on the spring 2013 Wildflower guide.

Phoenix Public Information Officer David Urbinato says a good rule is to look for wildflowers in preserve areas that face north. This is because the early spring sun will dry out rainfall.

Wildflowers are typically at their peak through late March. Popular varieties include lupine, and Mexican gold poppy, both of which will be out in large numbers.

Urbinato cautions people to stay on established, signaled trails and to refrain from picking flowers.

And for those who venture out to see the blooms, don't forget to share them. The City of Phoenix wants to see your 2013 favorites. E-mail photos to contactus@phoenix.gov.

The photos may be featured on the City of Phoenix and Parks and Recreation Department Facebook pages and the best photo may be selected as the “cover photo” for the City of Phoenix Facebook page.

Access to these areas may be limited Sunday due to an event but Urbinato says, “people can bike up to the main ranger station and walk to these trails on foot.”