Mother flies to Tucson to find missing son

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TUCSON, Ariz. -- The mother of a missing Tucson man is begging for help in finding her son.

Jordan Peterson, 21, disappeared more than a month ago and this week his mother flew in to town to try and find him.

"Jordan moved out here at the beginning of high school to live with his father and he did got to Pima College, you just working and doing whatever a 21-year-old kid does," said Lisa Jasman.

Lisa Jasman is Jordan Peterson's mother.   She flew over a thousand of miles form Sioux City, Iowa to be in the city where her son went missing.

"For me to be out here and to finally just feel like I'm near something, it does help a little bit," Jasman said.

Peterson went missing on November 16.  A few days later the Marana Police Department found his truck near Grier Road and I-10.

Monday afternoon his mother was at Tucson police headquarters meeting with detectives.

"There's no solid leads which has been our most difficult problem.  They have got subpoena and warrants for different things.  They're still waiting back for phone information and it all takes time," said Jasman.

Something the family found interesting in their conversation with TPD.  There was a report of witnesses seeing movement around Jordan's truck in Marana.

 

But as time passes it gets harder for his mom.

"When you're looking down at that massive desert, you know, and your son's been missing for over a month and out of the blue yeah its your worst fear are there and... uh yeah it was hard," Jasman said.

Monday night friends and family gathered at Reid Park to meet to hand out fliers to the public.

For Jordan's aunt it was a chance to meet his friends that have been helping with the search.

"It's a lot of concern.  We've kind of been joking around, talking about the memories we have, the things that we're holding on to, what's important to us," said Peterson's aunt Tricia Lyman.

What's important to Peterson's mom is finding her son or getting information to help them find him.

Anyone with information that leads up to an arrest in this case can receive up to a $26,000 reward by calling 911 or 88-crime.