National Unity Flag returns home to Ironwood High

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By Catherine Holland By Catherine Holland
By Catherine Holland By Catherine Holland
By Catherine Holland By Catherine Holland
By Catherine Holland By Catherine Holland
By Catherine Holland By Catherine Holland

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- The National Unity Flag, the first major 9/11 tribute, has been displayed all over the country and is the only item in our country's history to be signed by the entire U.S. Senate.

Envisioned and designed by Randy Cooney of Phoenix and constructed by Cathy Wallace, a teacher at Ironwood High School, with three students and a few community volunteers, the National Unity Flag was meant to remind everyone of the unique strength that unity inspires.

“The National Unity Flag was conceived in a state of reflective thought after witnessing the U.S. Congress spontaneously join hands and sing God Bless America shortly after the horrific and shattering events of September 11th, 2001. This historically divided group stood before a broken nation, reached out and symbolically said we will get through this together,” Cooney wrote. “May this fabric of unification, in all its majestic colors and patriotic symbolism, serve as a reminder to all, of Strength in Unity!”

Standing nearly three stories tall, the center of the massive flag features the Statue of Liberty. She surrounded by all 50 state and six U.S. District flags.

The flag carries the name of each victim of 9/11. The names of firemen are written in red, police officers in blue, and civilians in black.. The border of the flag is red, white and blue and along the bottom is the phrase, "3,046 Lost and 290,000,000 United."

In honor of the 10th anniversary of 9/11, the National Unity Flag has come home to Glendale, to Ironwood High School, for a special re-dedication ceremony.

"It's fun to have it come back to Ironwood since it was Ironwood energy that constructed the flag," Wallace said.