Firefighters rescue hiker injured while trying to escape bee attack

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Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland
Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland
Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland
Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland
Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack. By Catherine Holland

PHOENIX -- Firefighters had to go up Camelback Mountain Wednesday morning to help a hiker who injured his knee during an apparent bee attack.

The call came in at about 5:45 a.m.

According to Capt. Scott Walker of the Phoenix Fire Department, the 51-year-old man hurt his right knee while trying to get away from the bees that were attacking him.

"He injured his knee to the point that he's not able to put any weight not and unable to get himself down," Walker explained.

Crews planned to fly the man off the Cholla side of the mountain because it wasn't possible to get the big wheel to him.

Bee attacks like this are not uncommon.

"It is bee season," Walker said. "We started about a month ago and we've seen several attacks in the Valley. We'll continue to see them for the next few months. On all the trails, whether it be Camelback or Squaw Peak, we really have a lot of bees out there and you just really have to be careful."

"You have a lot of respect for bees," said the man, who is an experienced hiker. "I was in a hurry and blew out my knee."

Bees have been known to chase people for up to half a mile.

"Up there [on a mountain trail], you don't have any option to get away," Walker said.

Walker said the best thing hikers can do it try not aggravate the bees.