Seasonal plants

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With the cool weather here most of our plants in our yard take a siesta from all that hard work they did during the summer and getting any king of color seems to fall on the shoulders of annual plantings of seasonal flowers.

With the cool weather here most of our plants in our yard take a siesta from all that hard work they did during the summer and getting any king of color seems to fall on the shoulders of annual plantings of seasonal flowers.

Cool season flowers are easy and don’t require near the work that everyone is led to believe.

First dig out your bed at least 12 inches and add ½ inches peat moss with native soil. Also, add approximately 5# of bone meal and 5# of blood meal per 100 square feet.

Second, pick out the type of flowers you want. Some plants works better in cool weather than others so make sure you choose wisely.

Here are some of my favorites:

Calendula -- Try frost tolerant Kablouna mixed. Pinch buds back often.

Larkspur -- Direct seed right now! Loves cool weather.

Lobelia -- Purchase in containers easy to grow. Vibrant blue flowers.

Nasturtiums -- Sow from seeds. Thrives in unimproved soil. Grow to eat.

Pansy -- Easy to grow. Loves rich soil and damp conditions.

Shirley Poppy -- Grow from seeds and will reward if you plant in rich soil.

Snapdragon -- Reseeds easily. Becomes perennial in cool areas of your landscape.

Sweet Alyssum -- Sow from seeds or transplants. Reseeds easily and lasts all year round in my yard.

Sweet peas -- Deep rich soil is essential. Spencer varieties seem to do the best.

Stock Transonic varieties do best. Very fragrant. Loves to be frown in pots.

Next, start sowing your seeds or transplanting your flowers. After transplanting, give a light application of liquid seaweed for a little kick. Keep them damp and fertilize with a biweekly application of fish emulsion. Remember to keep them dead headed to increase the number of blooms. As for the seeds, make sure they stay damp until they are germinated.

Remember to enjoy the season and give your garden a little extra care right now. The rewards will be seen in the spring.