Group wants photo radar to be decided by voters

Posted: Updated:
Could appear on 2010 ballot
azfamily.com

PHOENIX - Already Wisconsin and West Virginia have banned photo radar and now, depending on the voters, Arizona could be next.

Shawn Dow, with camerafraud.com, says, "On November 2nd 2010 Arizona will join Wisconsin and West Virginia banning photo enforcement completely."

That is the camerafraud.com goal and Monday the paperwork was filed with the secretary of state to get an initiative on the ballot. Now all they need is 153,000 signatures.

First to sign was Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu. He says, " Among those cities and states that have eliminated photo radar, add Pinal County to it. Cheers."

State Sen. Russell Pearce is a fierce opponent of the cameras. " It's about fixing states problems on the backs of motorists," he admits. Pearce says it is a violation of the Arizona statute. " Civil traffic is reasonable prudent standard. It's merely a suggestion based on circumstances, according to Arizona 287014.

By executive, Governor Janet Napolitano deployed the cameras. Now Sen. Ron Gould says Arizonans should have their say. "Let the voters of the great State of Arizona decide if they want to be policed by cameras," Gould says.

Voters 3TV spoke with are split on the issue. One said, "I like it. I feel like people are driving slower now and taking they're time." Another person said, "It has slowed me down because I don't want to pay a $200 fee."

Another person adds, "It doesn't get the people off the road weaving in and out of traffic."

While public opinion seems split, the Department of Public Safety says photo radar works with fatal crashes already down nearly 30%. They estimate photo radar saves three lives a month.

DPS Lt. James Warriner explains, "The bottom line is if you want to defeat this, don't speed. Do the posted speed limit."

California, Maryland and Missouri are just a few of the states already calling because they are interested in Arizona's photo radar program. It is a program that, depending on the voters, may be short lived.