Protestors voice opinions against photo radar

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SCOTTSDALE - Most all of us have heard people complaining about the radar cameras, but today a group did something about it.

Protestors want to decide on photo radar
azfamily.com

They stood right here and tried to rally the city.

They stood on the corner of Thomas and Scottsdale roads waving anti-photo radar signs hoping to take these cameras off the streets.

"These cameras are coming down," Shawn Dow said.

The protestors claim the cameras are simply a way for the city to make money.

"When someone gets a citation the only penalty is monetary so it raises a lot of questions as to what the true intentions of the program are," Matt Sharp said. "Whether it's for safety or for profit. We believe it's for profit."

The Scottsdale Police Department claims it's for safety.

"Nobody in the police department or government wants you to like photo radar but what it is is a tool and just like people don't like getting pulled over by an officer because usually it will mean a ticket then it's the same thing with photo radar just with photo radar you don't have a chance to talk your way out of a ticket," Sgt. Mark Clark said.

But these protestors say voters never had a chance to talk at all.

"People know they never got to vote on whether or not they wanted their civil rights violated by having these cameras here," Dow said.

Recently there's been a photo radar controversy.

Reports show two DPS mobile photo radar units were not federally approved and the vans were parked.

The contracted company Redflex said it was an honest oversight.

Redflex has since become compliant and today the vans are back, but DPS said it will not refund the 4800 speeding fines that resulted from the non certified units.

"If they're not certified by the FCC, if they're not legal to use, then obviously they're not legitimate," Sharp said.

The group has started the website, camerafraud.com.

Hoping to rally more support the group is hoping someone will sponsor a bill to remove the cameras or at least put it on the ballot so voters can decide.