Carroll Township water crisis: 1 year later

Posted: Updated:
CARROLL TOWNSHIP, OH (Toledo News Now) -

Residents in Carroll Township, located east of Toledo, are all-too familiar with the dangers of toxic water. The township suffered its own water crisis just last year.

For Peggy Stine and her 11-year-old grandson Jason, summer wouldn't be the same without their favorite pastime: fishing. It usually takes Stine's mind off of things, but lately it reminds her of the water situation in Toledo and what happened in her area last year.

"It's very scary, even with the animals," Stine said. "You don't want them to die, either."

On Sept. 6, 2013, the chief toxin microcystin, produced by Lake Erie's 2013 algal bloom, had such extreme levels along the shores of Ottawa County, it knocked Carroll Township's water treatment plant offline. Two thousand people could not drink the water for days, leaving many questions.

"I wonder what's going to happen in the future when it's like this now?" Stine said. "They have to do something."

And the township officials did. Township Trustee Keeny Gyde says the ozone equipment for the township has been updated, among other things.

"We've increased some of the potassium permanganate they use and slowed down the filter rate they use at the plant," Gyde explained.

Carroll Township's treatment plant, one of the smaller plants in the area, now tests for microcystins on a weekly basis.

Gyde says these are steps that could help Toledo avoid another bad water situation.

"So far, we've been in pretty good shape," he said.

The township used 30 percent of their annual budget on upgrades at the treatment plant. That's another thing Gyde says Toledo should probably think about.

Follow Toledo News Now:  

Mobile users, click on the "video" button in the app to watch this story.Download our app here.

Copyright 2014 Toledo News Now. All rights reserved.