UPDATE

Demand for power soars as Phoenix broils

Posted: Updated:
Highs could hit 118 degrees in the lower deserts on Wednesday. (Source: CBS 5 News) Highs could hit 118 degrees in the lower deserts on Wednesday. (Source: CBS 5 News)
SRP set a record on Wednesday for power consumption. (Source: CBS 5 News) SRP set a record on Wednesday for power consumption. (Source: CBS 5 News)
PHOENIX (CBS5) -

The hottest weather of the season continues to punish thermometers and set records.

At 2:09 p.m. Thursday, the temperature in Phoenix climbed to 116 degrees, breaking the old record of 114 degrees set in 2001, CBS 5 Chief Meteorologist Chris Dunn said.

On Wednesday, Phoenix reached 114 degrees, tying the record high for the date set in 2006.

Salt River Project delivered a record-breaking 6,707 megawatts to its Phoenix-area retail customers between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. Wednesday.

That peak topped the previous SRP high this summer of 6,382 megawatts on July 22 and the all-time record of 6,663 megawatts on Aug. 8, 2012.

Arizona Public Service, meanwhile, estimated power usage was expected to hit 7,100 megawatts Wednesday, which would be the high for the year but not quite the record of 7,200 megawatts in July 2006.

Both utilities on Thursday were keeping a close eye on power consumption as the excessive heat warning for the Phoenix area dragged on.

The hottest parts of the desert in southwest and west-central Arizona were bracing for 115-degree heat.

The heat warning remains in effect through 8 p.m., Dunn said.

Overnight lows will be quite warm with readings ranging between the upper 80s to lower 90s.

A deep-layered high pressure ridge has planted itself over the region, sparking the unseasonably hot weather.

The hot weather wasted no time settling in. Phoenix hit 113 degrees on Tuesday, the hottest it has been all summer long.

The Salvation Army has deployed nine hydration stations across the Valley to provide heat relief services from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Each location will provide chilled bottled water and safety information.

The hydration stations are located at:

  • SW corner 16th and Jefferson streets (East Lake Park)
  • NE corner Third Avenue and Fillmore
  • SW Corner of Fifth Street and Hatcher
  • Phoenix Central Corps: 4343 N. 16th St. in Phoenix
  • Phoenix Maryvale Corps: 4318 W. Clarendon Ave. in Phoenix
  • Glendale Corps: 6010 W. Northern Ave. in Glendale
  • Chandler Corps: 85 E. Saragosa St. in Chandler
  • Mesa Corps: 241 E. 6th St. in Mesa
  • Tempe Corps: 40 E. University Dr. in Tempe

The Central Arizona Shelter Services said it is preparing to possibly take in hundreds more homeless people.    

Even before the hottest weather digs in, several hikers were overcome by dehydration and heat exhaustion over the weekend on Camelback Mountain and the Cholla Mountain Trailhead.

Capt. Danny Able of the Scottsdale Fire Department reminds people who are planning to go hiking in extreme temperatures to bring plenty of water, wear a hat and appropriate hiking shoes, bring a cell phone, hike with a buddy and tell friends or family where you will be hiking and your expected time back.

There is a greater likelihood of thunderstorms in the Valley as the weekend approaches. High temperatures should also drop a little Saturday and Sunday.

Copyright 2014 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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