MLB intends to ban home plate collisions

MLB intends to ban home plate collisions

MLB intends to ban home plate collisions

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by Ronald Blum, AP Sports Writer

azfamily.com

Posted on December 12, 2013 at 10:53 AM

Updated Thursday, Dec 12 at 11:05 AM

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Do you think home plate collisions should be banned?

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) -- Major League Baseball plans to eliminate home plate collisions.
 
New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson, chairman of the rules committee, made the announcement Wednesday at the winter meetings. He said player health and increased awareness of concussions were behind the decision.

Alderson said the exact wording had not been determined.

He said the rule will be given to owners for approval at their January meeting.

Approval of the players' union is needed for the rules change to be effective for 2014. MLB could make the change without union approval for 2015.

"I just want to try to eliminate any injuries, severe injuries," San Francisco Giants manager Bruce Bochy said Wednesday. "Whether it's a concussion or broken ankle, whatever."

Mets general manager Sandy Alderson, chairman of the rules committee, said the change would go into effect for next season if the players' association approved and in 2015 if it didn't. Safety and concern over concussions were major factors - fans still cringe at the thought of the season-ending hit Giants catcher Buster Posey absorbed in 2011.

"Ultimately what we want to do is change the culture of acceptance that these plays are ordinary and routine and an accepted part of the game," Alderson said. "The costs associated in terms of health and injury just no longer warrant the status quo."

Alderson said wording of the rules change will be presented to owners for approval at their Jan. 16 meeting in Paradise Valley, Ariz.

"We're going to do fairly extensive review of the types of plays that occur at home plate to determine which we're going to find acceptable and which are going to be prohibited," he said.

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