Japan investigator points to excessive voltage as cause of battery problem in ANA's Boeing 787

Print
Email
|

Associated Press

Posted on January 18, 2013 at 12:30 PM

Updated Friday, Jan 18 at 12:34 PM

TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese investigator says the burned insides of a battery from a Boeing 787 indicate it operated at a voltage above its design limit.

The lithium ion battery was located beneath the cockpit of an All Nippon Airways 787 that made an emergency landing Wednesday morning in western Japan after its pilots smelled something burning and received a cockpit warning of battery problems. Nearly all 50 of the 787s in use around the world have since been grounded.

Photos provided by the Japan Transport Safety Board show a blackened mass of wires and other components within a distorted blue casing.

A transport ministry investigator says the burned insides appear similar to the battery in a Japan Airlines 787 that caught fire while parked at Boston's Logan International Airport on Jan. 7. He says comparing data from the two batteries likely will reveal a common cause.

The 787 relies more than any other modern airliner on electrical signals to help power nearly everything the plane does. It's also the first Boeing plane to use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries for its main electrical system. Such batteries are prone to overheating.

%@AP Links

APPHOTO TOK808: This Jan. 17, 2013 photo provided by the Japan Transport Safety Board shows the distorted main lithium-ion battery of the All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 which made an emergency landing on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 at Takamatsu airport in Takamatsu, western Japan. U.S. safety officials and Boeing inspectors joined a Japanese investigation Friday into the 787 jet at the center of a worldwide grounding of the technologically advanced aircraft. The pilot of the ANA plane made an emergency landing Wednesday morning after he smelled something burning and received a cockpit warning of battery problems. All passengers evacuated the plane on emergency slides. (AP Photo/Japan Transport Safety Board) EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO SALES (17 Jan 2013)

<<APPHOTO TOK808 (01/17/13)>>

APPHOTO TOK807: This Jan. 17, 2013 photo provided by the Japan Transport Safety Board shows the distorted main lithium-ion battery and its lid, left, of the All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 which made an emergency landing on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 at Takamatsu airport in Takamatsu, western Japan. At right are the model in normal condition. U.S. safety officials and Boeing inspectors joined a Japanese investigation Friday into the 787 jet at the center of a worldwide grounding of the technologically advanced aircraft. The pilot of the ANA plane made an emergency landing Wednesday morning after he smelled something burning and received a cockpit warning of battery problems. All passengers evacuated the plane on emergency slides. (AP Photo/Japan Transport Safety Board) EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO SALES (17 Jan 2013)

<<APPHOTO TOK807 (01/17/13)>>

APPHOTO KSX101: All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 "the Dreamliner" parks on the tarmac at Haneda airport in Tokyo, Friday, Jan. 18, 2013. U.S. safety officials and Boeing inspectors joined a Japanese investigation Friday into the 787 jet at the center of a worldwide grounding of the technologically advanced aircraft. In the wake of the incident, nearly all 50 of the 787s in use around the world have been grounded. Aviation authorities in Japan have directed ANA, which owns 17 of the planes, and Japan Airlines, with seven, not to fly the jets until questions over their safety have been resolved. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) (18 Jan 2013)

<<APPHOTO KSX101 (01/18/13)>>

APPHOTO KSX102: All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 "the Dreamliner" parks on the tarmac at Haneda airport in Tokyo, Friday, Jan. 18, 2013. U.S. safety officials and Boeing inspectors joined a Japanese investigation Friday into the 787 jet at the center of a worldwide grounding of the technologically advanced aircraft. In the wake of the incident, nearly all 50 of the 787s in use around the world have been grounded. Aviation authorities in Japan have directed ANA, which owns 17 of the planes, and Japan Airlines, with seven, not to fly the jets until questions over their safety have been resolved. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara) (18 Jan 2013)

<<APPHOTO KSX102 (01/18/13)>>

Print
Email
|