Gun control advocates say Connecticut now has some of the toughest laws in the country

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Associated Press

Posted on April 4, 2013 at 12:30 PM

Updated Thursday, Apr 4 at 12:30 PM

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A gun control group says Connecticut is joining states like California, New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts in having the country's strongest gun control laws.

This, after the state's governor today signed a package of gun restrictions, including one that applies to large capacity ammunition magazines.

Family members of some of the victims of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School looked on as Gov. Dannel Malloy signed the bill, hours after it won final legislative approval.

The legislation adds more than 100 firearms to the state's assault weapons ban. It also creates what officials call the nation's first dangerous weapon offender registry.

Some lawmakers say the legislation didn't do enough to address mental health issues. One Republican said he hoped the measure would be just the "beginning in addressing critical mental health needs."

Brian Malte, with the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, says the measure puts Connecticut "right at the top or near the top of the states with the strongest gun laws."

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234-w-32-(Warren Levinson, AP correspondent, with Governor Dannel Malloy, D-Connecticut)--Connecticut's governor has signed a new package of gun controls. AP correspondent Warren Levinson reports. (4 Apr 2013)

<<CUT *234 (04/04/13)>> 00:32

232-a-08-(Nicole Hockley, mother of a Newtown victim, at bill signing)-"that turning point"-Nicole Hockley, whose son Dylan was among the 20 children killed in Newtown, says she's grateful for these restrictions on guns. (4 Apr 2013)

<<CUT *232 (04/04/13)>> 00:08 "that turning point"

233-r-22-(Applause, as Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy signed bipartison gun-control legislation into law in a ceremony at the state Capitol)--Sound of applause as Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy signed bipartison gun-control legislation into law in a ceremony at the state Capitol. (4 Apr 2013)

<<CUT *233 (04/04/13)>> 00:22

230-a-10-(Governor Dannel Malloy, D-Conn., at bill signing)-"so deeply divided"-Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy says if Connecticut legislators can unite over gun control, so can Congress. (4 Apr 2013)

<<CUT *230 (04/04/13)>> 00:10 "so deeply divided"

102-a-14-(State Senator Catherine Osten, D-Sprague, in Senate floor debate)-"in this state"-Connecticut State Senator Catherine Osten says tightening Connecticut's gun laws won't prevent future mass-shootings. (4 Apr 2013)

<<CUT *102 (04/04/13)>> 00:14 "in this state"

GRAPHICSBANK: John McKinney (l), as Senate Minority Leader, and Carlo Leone (r), as Connecticut Senator, Senate floor at the Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut, graphic element on gray (4 Apr 2013)

APPHOTO CTSR107: Nicole Hockley, right, mother of Sandy Hook School shooting victim Dylan Hockley, hugs Conn. state Sen. Beth Bye, D-West Hartford, center, as Neil Heslin, behind left, father of Sandy Hook shooting victim Jesse Lewis, looks on at the conclusion of legislation signing ceremonies at the Capitol in Hartford, Conn., Thursday, April 4, 2013. The legislation signed by Malloy adds more than 100 firearms to the state's assault weapons ban, sets eligibility rules for buying ammunition, and creates what officials have called the nation's first dangerous weapon offender registry. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (4 Apr 2013)

<<APPHOTO CTSR107 (04/04/13)>>

APPHOTO CTSR101: Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, center, signs legislation at the Capitol in Hartford, Conn., Thursday, April 4, 2013, that includes new restrictions on weapons and large capacity ammunition magazines, a response to last year's deadly school shooting in Newtown. Neil Heslin, behind left, father of Sandy Hook shooting victim Jesse Lewis, Nicole Hockley, right, mother of Sandy Hook School shooting victim Dylan, and Conn. Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, left, look on. The legislation adds more than 100 firearms to the state's assault weapons ban, sets eligibility rules for buying ammunition, and creates what officials have called the nation's first dangerous weapon offender registry. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) (4 Apr 2013)

<<APPHOTO CTSR101 (04/04/13)>>

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