Feds flood Grand Canyon to distribute sediment

Feds flood Grand Canyon to distribute sediment

Credit: Getty Images

PAGE, AZ - NOVEMBER 21: Water flows from the bypass tubes of Glen Canyon Dam at a rate of approximately 32,000 cubic feet per second November 21, 2004 in Page, Arizona. The water release is part of a five day experimental flood by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and will peak at 41,000 cubic feet per second. The flood will move sediment down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon helping to restore beaches and river habitat. (Photo by Jeff Topping/Getty Images)

Print
Email
|

by The Associated Press

azfamily.com

Posted on November 12, 2013 at 10:41 AM

Updated Tuesday, Nov 12 at 11:03 AM

PAGE, Ariz. (AP) -- The Department of the Interior has started another high-flow release from Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona.

It's the second release under an innovative science-based experimental plan approved in May 2012.

The goal of the releases is to help restore the environment in Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area while continuing to meet water and power needs and allowing continued scientific experimentation and monitoring on the Colorado River.

The 96-hour-release will pick up enough sand from river channels to fill a building as big as a football field and as tall as the Washington Monument, all the way to the brim.

The hundreds of thousands of tons of sediment from river channels will be re-deposited along downstream reaches as sandbars and beaches along the Colorado River.

Feds to flood Grand Canyon to distribute sediment

© 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Print
Email
|