Arpaio, MCSO called before judge to explain training video

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by The Associated Press & Jared Dillingham

Bio | Email | Follow: @JaredDillingham

Video report by Jared Dillingham

Posted on March 24, 2014 at 9:17 PM

Updated Thursday, Mar 27 at 2:56 PM

PHOENIX (AP) -- A judge presiding over a racial profiling case against an Arizona sheriff's office chided the sheriff and his top aide on Monday, telling them he's unimpressed by what he called their apparent "double dealing" for mischaracterizing his findings.
 
U.S. District Judge Murray Snow says he was disappointed with the inaccurate statements that Chief Deputy Jerry Sheridan, the top aide for Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, made during an October training session with sheriff's deputies

"This judge put the same constraints on us that a federal judge did on the New Orleans Police Department, and their officers were murdering people!  [That shows] you how ludicrous this crap is," Chief Sheridan tells the deputies in the audience.

"It's not just my opinion and the sheriff's opinion, but every lawyer I talked to, that Judge Snow violated the constitution," Sheridan continues, "The federal government does not have the authority to do what he did."

Arpaio and Sheridan are both aware they are being recorded.

"I'm sorry you have to do this. I wish we didn't have to waste our time doing this," Sheridan says.
 
The judge accused Sheridan of undermining his ruling, and ordered all sides of the case to court Monday.

Sheridan apologized for his statements. He says he made them out of frustration with declining morale among his deputies after Snow concluded last year that the agency has racially profiled Latinos.
 
Arpaio sat beside Sheridan in court, but didn't speak before the judge. 

The sheriff has appealed the judge's racial profiling ruling.  In addition to new training, the MCSO is putting cameras in patrol cars and has a new court-appointed monitor.

"To their credit, the MCSO came forward and admitted a serious mistake.  They said they won't make such a mistake again.  The proof will be in the pudding," ACLU attorney Cecilia Wang told reports after court.
 

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